Where Do You Get Your Information? by Christopher G. Moore

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There is has never been a time with more sources of information available for little or no cost to billions of people. An Internet connection puts you into a sea of information that your grandfather’s world would have found astounding. There is a dark side to the information revolution: misinformation, lies, fraud and deception like a magpie laying eggs in the information nest. The same can be said with the dissemination of opinion. It is no surprise that opinion, information, facts and evidence can appear like a rugby scrum on a muddy playing field. You can’t tell one player from another.

The first question to ask someone who makes a statement is to ask the source upon which it rests. Take a statement such as: “Vitamins are good for you. They will help you live longer.” Is this information reliable, supported by scientific research, and without qualification? In this case, recent studies indicate that vitamin taking correlates with a higher rate of mortality.

If someone is getting most of their information from the TV news or local newspaper, and accepting this ‘news’ as factual, reliable and tested, the chances are they are forming opinions based on actual knowledge and reality but upon the biases that the news sources wish others to share.

A reality check on bias is to take any news story and run a background check. Make yourself into a reality check detective and the news story is a suspect that may or not have anything to do with the opinion of the evidence you are evaluating.

Not only is theere a flood of information, there is also a tsunami of misinformation. There are political and commercial reasons to pass off misinformation in the high stakes game of making a profit or gaining and retaining power. Facts and information take high casualty rates in this struggle. Foundations, institutes, TV stations draw large audience with misinformation.

True ignorance is allowing oneself to be trapped in a narrow information zone because the views and ideology have a strong emotional appeal. Cults are built on faith. Information within a cult flows from faith, loyalty and authority and is to be defended against any contrary information. The bad blood in many countries, including Thailand, is caused by failures of information access, processing, discussing and evaluation.

Freedom of expression includes the right to consider all information and facts. In restricted political expression systems, censorship and threat of imprisonment is used to confine and narrow the sources of information.  Open access to all information is threatening to entrenched elites who have a monopoly over information channels and content. It is only with the channels gone global and people able to access them from their office and home has the possibility of challenging the old information monopoly arisen.

But the possibilities of access aren’t enough. Many people are lazy thinkers and are happy to let others ‘bake that pie’ and they’re happy enough to eat it without asking too many questions about ingredients or the kitchen where it was prepared let alone the goal of the owners. The Hume distinction between ‘ought’ and ‘is’ makes their eyes glaze over. Pass the popcorn. The idea that information requires intellectual work on their part is not popular. For many so long as the news is ideologically consistent with their worldview or entertaining, that is sufficient to ‘believe’ it is true. There is no independent reality check.

Education means teaching students that ‘what you see is all there is’ is a bias. An inquiry needs to be made as to what is missing or absent from a study, survey or opinion. It also means teaching students that information is messy by nature. Most of the time there is uncertainty and doubt about agency and causation. We can’t predict outcomes in the future. We can come up with probability of outcomes understanding that ‘dark’ horses sometimes win a race.

Consumer society has been a great success because of its ability to create a vast population of docile, passive and status-seeking consumers. Huxley’s Brave New World  in 1932 long before the advent of computers and the Internet warned that these characteristics of the new man/woman would allow state sponsored repression of the truth to go unnoticed, unchallenged. Soma. The mental state of artificial well-being that covers lies and deceit.

We live much of our lives online where bit-by-bit we give up for free our social networks, our private thoughts, medical history, doubts, books, TV shows and films, and political positions. This information is shoveled into the great maw of surveillance systems to track those with deviant connections, thoughts or ideas; to create better soma for consumers to fall into a deeper sleep. In this brave new world, information independence becomes a crime. Those who dig too deep find that they are digging their own graves.

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www.cgmoore.com

Pre-order: The Marriage Tree, new book from Vincent Calvino series.
(Publication date: 8 January 2014)

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Christopher G. Moore
3 comments on “Where Do You Get Your Information? by Christopher G. Moore
  1. Chris,

    Quite a timely topic for those of us watching from a distance and not knowing how much hot air is being pumped re the BKK protests.

    Your prompt to question what one hears or reads is a good one. I recall the film Thank You For Smoking, in which a PR guy for big tobacco teaches his son just that, and he is able to ‘spin’ almost anything to make big tobacco look good, until his son finally asks too many unanswerable questions! It is a film well worth watching.

    With respect to the current situation in BKK it would be great to get the real inside scoop from those close to the action … although I suspect even in such a position might not even know for sure, let alone explain it in an essay. A book might not even be enough!

    A pop quiz on this topic for all RC readers: who made the following statement…

    “The Number One Enemy of Progress is Question…”??

  2. Jarad, a major limitation is that most positions are influenced by a variety of cognitive biases. The biases act as a filter on information, distorting the selection, analysis, and use. Biases are fueled by passions and non-reflective thinking. Each side trades ‘impressions’, ‘threats’, ‘accusations’ and ‘insults’ and deeply layered information and data is ignored. Before any one is elected in the future they might have to reveal their results on one of these tests: Dungeon Scrawl or Wasabi Waiter. This article in the Atlantic points to such a future. http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2013/12/theyre-watching-you-at-work/354681/

  3. Datafication, a scary buzz word, although not surprising.

    I know many people who’ve been anlysed, metric tested, IQ grilled and psycholoically toasted fo even the most mundane jobs.

    Human Alanlytics in HR…. wonder what’s next!

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